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Did She Kill Him? A Victorian Tale of Deception, Adultery and Arsenic

by Kate Colquhoun - £8.99  Little, Brown Book Group (Abacus) (2015)
paperback    ISBN 13: 9780349138565 | ISBN 10: 0349138567

The sensational murder trial of Florence Maybrick that gripped Victorian society. In the summer of 1889, young Southern belle Florence Maybrick stood trial for the alleged arsenic poisoning of her much older husband, Liverpool cotton merchant James Maybrick.
 
'The Maybrick Mystery' had all the makings of a sensation: a pretty, flirtatious young girl; resentful, gossiping servants; rumours of gambling and debt; and torrid mutual infidelity. The case cracked the varnish of Victorian respectability, shocking and exciting the public in equal measure as they clambered to read the latest revelations of Florence's past and glimpse her likeness in Madame Tussaud's.
 
Florence's fate was fiercely debated in the courtroom, on the front pages of the newspapers and in parlours and backyards across the country. Did she poison her husband? Was her previous infidelity proof of murderous intentions? Was James' own habit of self-medicating to blame for his demise?
 
Historian Kate Colquhoun recounts an utterly absorbing tale of addiction, deception and adultery that keeps you asking to the very last page, did she kill him?

(Price & availability last checked: January 2015)

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Featured book: Recommended books for Yuletide 2015!,
In booklists: British History - Pre 20th Century, Trials, Liverpool History,
In categories: History & Biography, Ireland, Scotland & Wales, Society, Welfare, Justice & the State, Local Interest,

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